Skip directly to content

Vettec Site RSS Feed

Sound or Lame: It’s Often Found in the Health of the Sole

on Wed, 02/22/2017 - 22:52
When it comes to keeping your horse healthy, hoof care is often the critical element that allows you to enjoy normal activities with your horse, such as riding.

When it comes to keeping your horse healthy, hoof care is often the critical element that allows you to enjoy normal activities with your horse, such as riding. Both shod and unshod, otherwise known as shoed or barefoot, philosophies offer benefits, but also come with limitations, which directly affect the health of the soles. While shoeing is necessary for many horses, a shod foot does not absorb shock as efficiently, mostly because shoeing raises the sole and frog off the ground, and constrains the normal flex of the foot.

Educational Partner of the 2017 International Hoof-Care Summit

on Wed, 12/07/2016 - 23:20
Vettec is proud to be an Educational Partner of the 2017 International Hoof-Care Summit

Vettec is proud to be an Educational Partner of the 2017 International Hoof-Care Summit coming up January 24-27 in Cincinnati. Featuring 76 hours of focused learning on hoof-care topics that matter most, these 4 knowledge-packed days that will forever improve your effectiveness, efficiency and profitability. Save $30.00 when you register today at the special $369 Early Bird Rate. 

Do Adhesives Used on the Equine Hoof Trap Moisture?

on Wed, 11/23/2016 - 20:01
Adhesives are not recommended if the area cannot be properly debrided and disinfected.

Many people ask if the acrylic and urethane adhesives currently used on horse’s feet trap moisture resulting in adverse effects.  The answer should be no, but it’s not always that simple.

Before we can answer the bigger question, we must first understand the importance of moisture.  The equine foot naturally contains moisture generated internally from blood circulation; it keeps tissues pliable for shock absorption.  Obviously the environment also plays a huge role in maintaining moisture balance.

How Bars Affect Feet

on Tue, 11/22/2016 - 00:21

A horse that is at risk of developing  unhealthy bars may have one of the following characteristics:

  • Stacked sole
  • Pinched heels

Signs that a horse may have unhealthy bars:

  • The horse appears lame
  • White lamina lines (bars) are not visible when looking at the sole
  • The sole appears stacked
  • The horse has a bruised sole or an abscess

Managing and maintaining healthy bars to recovery:

  • Limit activity level (riding and exercise)
  • Examine the hoof cavities to make sure that the bars (lamina) are visible
  • If bars are not visible, bars should be trimmed such that the lamina of the sole are visible
  • In

Sweet River Equine Clinic with Vettec

on Mon, 11/14/2016 - 20:42
Attendees at the Sweet River Equine Clinic were able to asses a hoof condition and decide on the best course of action.
Equi-Pak Soft is used with an aluminum shoe to provide protection and support.

Dr. Dan Sweet of Sweet River Equine Clinic in Modesto, California hosted his annual clinic to bring vets and farriers together to share knowledge and experience.  This year’s guest speaker/clinician was Dr. Raul Bras, an equine veterinarian and certified journeyman farrier from Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital in Kentucky.  Dr. Bras is part of the Podiatry Group at the hospital and has successfully treated many high dollar horses, and chronic cases.  Topics included Hi-Lo Syndrome, Angular deformities, Low Heel Conformation, and Navicular Syndrome.

Pages